Tuesday June 18th 2019

Snape

October 28th, 2010 by
Categories: Suffolk Towns A-Z

An Anglo-Saxon ship was unearthed at Snape in 1862, the ship was dated to around AD625. The village of Snape has been a port, albeit a small one, since Roman times, mainly dealing with coal and grain. The river is tidal as far as Snape, however the sea although only 5 miles as the crow flies is in fact 20 miles by boat. It was the riverside location that made it an ideal choice for Newson Garrett to build his maltings. Here he processed locally grown barley and then shipped it from Snape to the London brewers.

Most of the buildings date from 1850 onwards and are quite unique in their appearance. Nowadays they are not used for malthouse work but instead house a selection of shops, art galleries, restaurants and since 1967, the Snape Maltings Concert Hall.

The idea for the concert hall came from Lowestoft born composer Benjamin Britten (who lived at nearby Aldeburgh), Eric Crozier and Peter Pears. The men had been looking for a permanent base for their musical event that had first started in 1948. Queen Elizabeth II opened the new concert hall in 1969 and on the opening night an electrical fault resulted in the whole interior being burnt out. Twelve months later the Queen returned to the newly restored concert hall to once more “open it”.

Since that time the Snape Maltings Festival has become an annual event and one that has made the tiny village of Snape world famous.

As well as the arts the area is also officially recognised an “an area of outstanding natural beauty” with some excellent walks along the riverbank and opportunities for birdwatchers and nature lovers.

Where to Eat
Plough and Sail Pub
Snape Maltings, Snape.
Tel: 01728 688413
Adjacent to the Maltings – Excellent selection of food and ales.
Open daily – 12 noon until 11pm


The Crown Inn,
Bridge Road,
Snape

Getting there
By Road: Easy access via A14 and A12 heading North on A12 after Ipswich, signposted Great Yarmouth. Snape is signposted off A12 about 20 miles out of Ipswich.

Train: Rail access to Snape from Saxmundham (nearest rail station) regular service to Ipswich, Lowestoft and London.

Where to stay

Flint House Bed and Breakfast
Aldeburgh Road (A1094),
Friston, Suffolk IP17 1PD.
Tel: 01728 689123

Joan Bakewell, BBC and Broadcast Journalist said of her time there – “Lovely stay – so comfortable!”

A luxury, country property situated midway between Aldeburgh and Snape offering comfortable, non-smoking rooms overlooking the rear and front gardens, and surrounding countryside.

Website orĀ Email for further information


Croft Farm Self Catering Accommodation
Snape, Saxmundham, Suffolk, IP17 1QU
Tel: 01728 688 254

Croft Farm provides self-catering accommodation in the heart of the Suffolk Heritage Coast. Situated in a very peaceful location the Farm is 15 minutes walk from the centre of Snape village and within one mile of the world renowned Snape Maltings Concert Hall.

The two holiday cottages have been converted from traditional farm buildings to provide the perfect location for families and couples to enjoy the peaceful Suffolk countryside.

Website Email


Orford Cottages – A selection of luxury fully equipped self-catering holiday cottages for two to six people in Orford and Sudbourne.

Contact Sue Cartlidge on 01728 687 844 or 07836 293925
Website E-mail

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